Swooning over science

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Charles Proteus Steinmetz, theoretician of alt...

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My old hometown is chasing its tail like a puppy because it has been blessed by a Hollywood visitation. A soon-to-be-a-major-motion-picture is being shot in Scotia and Schenectady, and people are understandably excited. (I tend to be more miffed than excited by these things, as the regular residents and commuters of a city are massively inconvenienced for weeks at a time so that Angelina Jolie's stunt double can hang from one of our collapsing bridges, but I'm well on my way to codgerdom.) However, knowing that the movie will run for about two weeks, and a couple of years after that there's a good chance no one will even remember who these actors are, I think it's worth pointing out that for decades, Schenectady attracted real stars, the true geniuses who made our world what it is today, people who are actually deserving of recognition.

We could start with Charles Proteus Steinmetz, the genius who made alternating current what it is today. The one who developed General Electric's research and development center. The one who suffered from dwarfism, hunchback, and more ailments, escaped from German persecution for his socialist ideals, and became president of the Schenectady school board and city council. It was because of Steinmetz that dozens of other giants of physics and electricity came to visit him right in Schenectady. And they're all recorded in the sign-in book from the research lab -- originally located in Steinmetz's barn.

Thomas Edison was one, of course. He didn't visit Schenectady frequently and had opposed research outside of his Menlo Park labs (and his control), but by then the fate of General Electric was well out of the Wizard's hands. So was Niels Bohr, Nobel Prize winner, creator of the most widely used model of the atom, and a pioneer in quantum mechanics. J.J. Thomson, discoverer of the electron and isotopes, and inventor of the mass spectrometer. Guglielmo Marconi, inventor of the radio telegraph. Kunihiko Iwadare, founder of Nippon Electric Co., now known as NEC. Ivan Pavlov, best known for his dogs. Clifford C. Paterson, GE's research director in the UK.  Fritz Haber, Nobel Prize-winning chemist who also came from Steinmetz's hometown of Breslau.

Now those are some names to swoon over.
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This page contains a single entry by Carl published on August 21, 2011 2:39 PM.

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